Haunted Ground

Haunted Ground

Haunted Ground

Erin Hart

When farmers cutting turf in an Irish peat bog make a grisly discovery — the perfectly preserved head of a young woman — archaeologist Cormac Maguire and pathologist Nora Gavin must use cutting-edge techniques to preserve ancient evidence.  However, the girl is not the only enigma in this remote corner of Galway.  Two years earlier, the wife of a local landowner went for a walk with her young son and vanished without a …

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Wife 22

Wife 22

Wife 22

Melanie Gideon

Alice Buckle has been married for almost 20 years, has two wonderful children, and wonders if this is it.  She signs up to participate in a computer study of marriage in the twenty-first century, for which she will answer a series of questions about her life and marriage.  She becomes the anonymous “Wife 22,” communicating with Researcher 101.  Mixed in with the story are Facebook posts, letters, emails, texts and Tweets, all of …

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The World of Neil Peart’s Clockwork Angels

The World of Neil Peart’s Clockwork Angels

I’ve had Rush’s amazing album, Clockwork Angels, on perpetual repeat in my car CD player lately.  I never get tired of the bass lines and the driving percussion, not to mention the big fat guitar sounds.  After many, many listens I thought to myself “hey, this would make a great rock opera. I would totally go see that”.  There is a clear story line in the album and the grandiose themes and scenes are definitely worthy of …

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Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach Trilogy

Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach Trilogy

KFPL now has the first two volumes (Annihilation and Authority) of Jeff VanderMeer’s superbly creepy Southern Reach Trilogy.   The third volume (Acceptance) is on order and we expect it to arrive shortly after its September 2nd publication date.  Just click on any title to place your reservation.

First of all, here’s what Jeff VanderMeer said about the genesis of the series:

“Ideas creep in from all over the place, …

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New Book Club Set: ‘Polly of Bridgewater Farm’ by Catharine Fleming McKenty

New Book Club Set: ‘Polly of Bridgewater Farm’ by Catharine Fleming McKenty

Catharine Fleming McKenty, the author of Polly of Bridgewater Farm: an Unknown Irish Story, has made us a very generous donation of ten copies of her book, in memory of her late husband Neil McKenty.  We have added them as a Book Club Set to the collection at the Isabel Turner branch.  Just click on the title to reserve the set.

Aunt Polly

Polly of Bridgewater Farm is a fictionalized account of …

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The Apple Lover’s Cookbook

The Apple Lover’s Cookbook

The Apple Lover’s Cookbook

Amy Traverso

Looking for new ways to enjoy an old favourite? Traverso offers recipes both sweet and savoury. When you just can’t resist a basketful at the market or orchard stand, flip through her guide to 59 varieties to learn more about their flavour and ideal use in the kitchen.  The Swedish Apple Pie, featuring Northern Spy, is highly recommended! For more great apple tips and other foodie fare, follow the …

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New Book Club Set: Ruth Ozeki’s ‘A Tale for the Time Being’

New Book Club Set: Ruth Ozeki’s ‘A Tale for the Time Being’

The Book Ends Book Club in Sydenham has made us a very generous donation of a Book Club Set of the 2013 novel  A Tale for the Time Being  by Ruth OzekiLibrary Journal‘s reviewer had this to say about the book: “Ozeki’s beautifully crafted work, which arrives a decade after her last novel, All Over Creation, strives to unravel the mystery of a 16-year-old Japanese …

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The Killing Way

The Killing Way

The Killing Way

Tony Hays

It is the time of Arthur, but this is not his storied epic. When a young woman is brutally murdered and the blame is placed at Merlin’s feet, Arthur’s reputation is at stake and his enemies are poised to strike. Arthur turns to Malgwyn ap Cuneglas, a man whose keen insight into the human mind has helped Arthur come to the brink of kingship. Think CSI: Medieval:  gritty, powerful, and with the …

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“Forgotten On the Shelves”: ‘Bellwether’ by Connie Willis

“Forgotten On the Shelves”: ‘Bellwether’ by Connie Willis

Those who are familiar only with Connie Willis‘ most recent works, the alternate history WWII novels Blackout and All Clear (both published in 2010), may be pleasantly surprised by her earlier novel Bellwether.  It’s short — only 243 pages long — and although readers have debated whether or not it’s really sf, it was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1997.  Set in the present-day of its publication …

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If Walls Could Talk: An Intimate History of the Home

If Walls Could Talk:  An Intimate History of the Home

If Walls Could Talk:  An Intimate History of the Home

Lucy Worsley

Why did the flushing toilet take two centuries to catch on? Why did medieval people sleep sitting up? When were the two “dirty centuries”? Why did gas lighting cause Victorian ladies to faint?  Why, for centuries, did people fear fruit?  All these questions will be answered in this juicy, smelly and truly intimate history of home life.  Worsley takes us through the architectural history of …

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The Magicians

The Magicians

The Magicians

Lev Grossman

The Magicians is to Harry Potter as a shot of Irish whiskey is to a glass of weak tea.” – George R. R. Martin, author of Game of Thrones

Like everyone else, high school senior Quentin Coldwater assumes that magic isn’t real, until he finds himself admitted to a very secretive and exclusive college of magic in upstate New York.  There he indulges in joys of college — friendship, love, sex, and booze — and receives …

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Ecological Science Fiction

Ecological Science Fiction

After reading about the new sf movie Snowpiercer  (based on the French graphic novel Le Transperceneige) and its class warfare confined to a thousand and one train cars running through the Earth’s final ice age, I was reminded of the long tradition of ecological sf.  From J. G. Ballard’s post-ecological apocalypses of the 1960s and Frank Herbert’s classic Dune through to Kim Stanley Robinson’s Capital Code Trilogy, sf writers have come …

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