New Book Club Set: Ania Szado’s ‘Studio Saint-Ex’

New Book Club Set: Ania Szado’s ‘Studio Saint-Ex’

We have added a new Book Club Set at the Central Library: the 2013 historical novel Studio Saint-Ex, by Canadian novelist Ania Szado.  This addition was made possible through the generosity of the Friends of KFPL.

Here’s how Publisher’s Weekly reviewed Studio Saint-Ex:  “Szado (Beginning of Was) crafts the facts of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s life into an engaging tale of youth, power, and longing set in …

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The Mists of Avalon

The Mists of Avalon

The Mists of Avalon   

Marion Zimmer Bradley

Isaac Asimov called The Mists of Avalon “the best retelling of the Arthurian Saga I have ever read.” Mists is the magical legend of King Arthur vividly retold through the eyes and lives of the women who wielded power from behind the throne.  From their childhoods through the ultimate fulfillment of their destinies, the novel follows these women and the diverse cast of characters that surrounds them as the …

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New Book Club Set: ‘The Orchardist’ by Amanda Coplin

New Book Club Set: ‘The Orchardist’ by Amanda Coplin

We have another new Book Club Set at the Central Library, thanks to a very generous donation by the Friends of KFPL:  Amanda Coplin‘s 2012 debut novel The Orchardist.  Library Journal’s reviewer had this to say:

“Coplin’s compelling, well-crafted debut tracks the growing obsession of orchardist William Talmadge, who has lived at the foothills of the Cascade Mountains since the summer of 1857, when he was nine.  A loner shaped …

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Somewhere in France

Somewhere in France

Somewhere in France

Jennifer Robson

In keeping with the hundredth anniversary of World War I this month, Somewhere in France is a perfect read.  Written by Canadian Jennifer Robson, it is a wartime romance between Lilly, a British debutante, and Robbie, a surgeon.  The story is told through the grim realities of working and fighting on the front line, where Lilly drives an ambulance in France and Robbie works in the field hospital.  In a world divided …

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WWI in Fantasy, SF and Horror Fiction

WWI in Fantasy, SF and Horror Fiction

In keeping with KFPL’s programming theme this month (World War I: Home Town, Home Front), here is a handful of sf, fantasy and horror novels which deal with WWI.  Some are alternate histories, some involve time travel, and no more than a few feature long-lived vampires who experienced the Great War.  Just click on any title to place a hold.

If you’re also interested in genre titles which were first published between 1914 and …

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WWI Home Town, Home Front: Knitting for Soldiers

WWI Home Town, Home Front: Knitting for Soldiers

During World War I citizens — women, children and men unable to serve in the military — volunteered thousands of hours to support the war effort.  They worked in factories, they bought war bonds, they grew extra food in home gardens and canned it for storage, they made clothing for refugees, they rolled bandages, they wrote letters for soldiers in hospital, they made hospital gowns and they donated material for “comfort packages” to be distributed …

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C. J. Cherryh’s ‘Chanur’ series

C. J. Cherryh’s ‘Chanur’ series

I read the first four books in  C. J. Cherryh‘s  Chanur  series back in the 1980s as they were published, and then pounced on the final volume in 1992 when she revisited the series — and the next generation of characters — after a six-year absence.  The story is a variation on the classic first contact theme, from the viewpoint of technologically advanced aliens coming into contact with humanity.  (This …

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New Book Club Set: ‘The Beginner’s Goodbye’ by Anne Tyler

New Book Club Set: ‘The Beginner’s Goodbye’ by Anne Tyler

We have just added a new Book Club Set at our Isabel Turner Branch:  Anne Tyler‘s 2012 novel The Beginner’s Goodbye.  This addition was made possible through the generosity of the Friends of Kingston Frontenac Public Library.

Booklist‘s reviewer had this to say about The Beginner’s Goodbye:

“Tyler’s bright charm resides in her signature blend of the serious with the larky.  Adept at dissecting family life, she is also …

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Folks, this ain’t normal: a farmer’s advice for happier hens, healthier people, and a better world

Folks, this ain’t normal: a farmer’s advice for happier hens, healthier people, and a better world

Folks, this ain’t normal: a farmer’s advice for happier hens, healthier people, and a better world

Joel Salatin

Farmer Joel Salatin discusses how far removed we are from the simple, sustainable joy that comes from living close to the land and the people we love. From child-rearing, to creating quality family time, to respecting the environment, Salatin writes with a wicked sense of humor and true storyteller’s knack for the revealing anecdote. Salatin’s crucial message and distinctive …

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New Book Club Set: ‘Ender’s Game’ by Orson Scott Card

New Book Club Set: ‘Ender’s Game’ by Orson Scott Card

The Friends of Kingston Frontenac Public Library have very generously given us a new Book Club Set: Orson Scott Card‘s well-loved science fiction novel,  Ender’s Game.  First published in book-length form in 1985 (an expansion of a 1977 short story), and marketed to adult readers, Ender’s Game‘s coming-of-age storyline and its message of acceptance for young misfits quickly made it a hit with teens and younger readers.  It …

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Carnivals and Circuses in Fantasy and Horror Fiction

Carnivals and Circuses in Fantasy and Horror Fiction

The winding down of summer and the turning into fall always makes me think of fall fairs, circuses and travelling carnivals. Aside from the Andre Norton title Beast Master’s Quest  below (and the sadly out-of-print Circus World series by Barry Longyear and the “Message” episode from Firefly)  I can’t think of any science fiction dealing with this topic, but there’s certainly a respectable number of fantasy and horror titles …

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Haunted Ground

Haunted Ground

Haunted Ground

Erin Hart

When farmers cutting turf in an Irish peat bog make a grisly discovery — the perfectly preserved head of a young woman — archaeologist Cormac Maguire and pathologist Nora Gavin must use cutting-edge techniques to preserve ancient evidence.  However, the girl is not the only enigma in this remote corner of Galway.  Two years earlier, the wife of a local landowner went for a walk with her young son and vanished without a …

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